Hidden drugs create possession issues

| Sep 3, 2020 | criminal defense |

Arizona residents may have heard about a recent case involving heroin possession and intent to distribute from a motel room in Cottonwood. Four people are accused of possessing multiple packets of heroin found in a “hide-a-can” that looks like a common beverage container but hides valuables. Police investigated reports of drug trafficking from a Cottonwood motel room. Officers stopped a car leaving the motel, and a K9 dog reportedly detected drugs inside, which the police claim to have found in the fake can.

Legal search triggers criminal charges

A legal search of the car and motel room is said to have turned up a total of four suspects. The police reportedly recovered about 20 grams of heroin packed in small baggies, a syringe containing heroin residue and other paraphernalia containing fentanyl residue. According to reports, the four suspects admit to parts of the apparent criminal activity, but only one says that some of the heroin was his. The other three say that they had no idea the heroin was there and that it was not theirs.

Proximity triggers possession charges

The proximity of the drugs, the paraphernalia found and the admitted use by suspects could add up to serious felony charges against all four. However, none are accepting full blame for the heroin, which makes them all liable for possession charges. According to police, the packaged quantities are a clear indication of an intent to distribute the drugs, which makes the charges more formidable.

Schedule I drug offenses face stiff penalties

The federal government places heroin and fentanyl on its list of Schedule I drugs, which are those with highly addictive potential and little to no medicinal value. That means the penalties for possession are very strong. The penalties for dealing Schedule I drugs are even more severe and can lead to life sentences for those involved.

Whenever criminal law charges reach the level of felony drug possession and distribution, an experienced attorney may be an asset to the defendant. An attorney may give an honest and accurate assessment of the case and help the defendant to reach a sensible outcome while ensuring that their legal rights are upheld.